Food for Gods and Men – Some Roman Cookbooks

by

Untitled Marcus Gavius Apicius (translated by Joseph Dommers Vehling), Cookery and Dining in Imperial Rome: A Bibliography, Critical Review, and Translation of Apicius’ De Re Coquinaria

ISBN: 1500781746 | 2014 | 144 pages | CreateSpace

ISBN: 0486235637 | 1977 | 301 pages | Dover Publications

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Cookery-Dining-Imperial-Rome-Apicius/dp/1500781746/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Cookery-Dining-Imperial-Rome-Apicius/dp/0486235637/

Apicius’ De Re Coquinaria has been printed again and again in Latin and has been translated into Italian and German. It is unnecessary to here give historic details regarding the work as Mr. Vehling goes fully and admirably into the subject. In 1705 the book was printed in Latin at London, with notes by Dr. Martinus Lister. It caused some stir in the England of that time. In a very curious book, The Art of Cookery, in Imitation of Horace’s Art of Poetry, with Some Letters to Dr. Lister and Others, Dr. Wm. King says: “The other curiosity is the admirable piece of Cœlius Apicius, ‘De Opsoniis et condimentis sive arte coquinaria, Libri decem’ being ten books of soups and sauces, and the art of cookery, as it is excellently printed for the doctor, who in this important affair, is not sufficiently communicative….

From the 1936 edition. This is an English translation of the oldest known cookbook in existence. The book was originally written for professional cooks working in Ancient Rome, and contains actual recipes presented in the form of a cookbook. The work is translated with the intention of providing an actual cookbook rather than as a scholarly translation of an ancient text. Illustrated. Includes a critical review of the work, a bibliography of early editions and a thorough index. The text is organized in ten books which are arranged in a manner similar to a modern cookbook: Epimeles – The Careful Housekeeper Sarcoptes – The Meat Mincer Cepuros – The Gardener Pandecter – Many Ingredients Ospreon – Pulse Aeropetes – Birds Polyteles – The Gourmet Tetrapus – The Quadruped Thalassa – The Sea Halieus – The Fisherman

“I have long held the notion that food in Imperial Rome was heavily spiced and made with the finest and most expensive of ingredients, as befitting the most expansive Empire in the World. Apparently, I was wrong. The entire first section of the cookbook (beginning at locations 1022-27 – prior to this is historical dissertation) describes multiple ways to mask rotten food or broths, so that people will eat them anyway without realizing they’ve gone bad, and recipes for various drinks to cure their ills after eating the rotten food! I was interested in attempting the Rose Wine until reading the footnote following the recipe – “Used principally as a laxative medicine. List. These wines compounded of roses and violets move the bowels strongly.” I subsequently decided against serving this at my next dinner party.” – Mommy of Twins

Very lively reviews for this book and much criticism of its translator.

 

Unknown-7

Christopher Grocock & Sally Grainger, Apicius: A Critical Edition

ASIN: 1903018137 | 2006 | 448 pages | Prospect Books

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Apicius-Marcus-Gavius/dp/1903018137/

Apicius is the sole remaining cookery book from the days of the Roman Empire. Though there were many ancient Greek and Latin works concerning food, this collection of recipes is unique. The editors suggest that it is a survival from many such collections maintained by working cooks and that the attribution to Apicius the man (a real-life Roman noble of the 2nd century AD), is a mere literary convention. There have been many English translations of this work (and, abroad, some important academic editions) but none reliable since 1958 (Flower and Rosenbaum). In any case, this edition and translation has revisited all surviving manuscripts in Europe and the USA and proposes many new readings and interpretations. The great quality of this editorial team is while the Latin scholarship is supplied by Chris Grocock, Sally Grainger contributes a lifetime’s experience in the practical cookery of adaptations of the recipes in this text. This supplies a wholly new angle from which to verify the textual and editorial suggestions.

 

Torrent: http://www.demonoid.pw/files/details/3137774/005425792864/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Cooking-Apicius-Marcus-Gavius/dp/1903018447/

Apicius, of course, is Marcus Gavius Apicius, one of the few Roman writers whose comments on cookery survive, in his De Re Coquinaria.

z0xRI5EVsgnO6AaiJkniccA6GnYQJUoi

Sally Grainger, Marcus Gavius Apicius, Cooking Apicius: Roman Recipes for Today

ISBN: 1903018447 | 2006 | EPUB,PDF,MOBI | 128 pages | 4 MB

Sally Grainger has gathered, in one convenient volume, her modern interpretations of 64 of the recipes in the Apicius’ original text. These is not ‘recipes inspired by the old Romans’ but rather a serious effort to convert the extremely gnomic instructions in the Latin into something that can be reproduced in the modern kitchen which actually gives some idea of what the Romans might have eaten. Sally Grainger, therefore, has taken great pains to suggest means of replicating the particular Roman taste for fermented fish sauce. It may sound unpleasant, but actually is not too far removed from the fish sauces of the Southeast Asia and any reproduction of Roman cookery must depend on getting this particular aspect right.

 

Untitled

Andrew Dalby & Sally Grainger, The Classical Cookbook

ISBN: 0892363940 | 1996 | 160 pages | J. Paul Getty Museum

ISBN: 1606061100 | 2012 | 144 pages | J. Paul Getty Museum

ISBN: 0714122750 | 2012 | 176 pages | British Museum Press

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Classical-Cookbook-Andrew-Dalby/dp/0892363940/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Classical-Cookbook-Revised-Andrew-Dalby/dp/1606061100/

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Classical-Cookbook-Andrew-Dalby-Grainger/dp/0714122750/

Fifty recipes from the ancient world are presented in a fresh, new design alongside reproductions of ancient wall paintings, mosaics, vases, and household objects.  Originally published in 1996, The Classical Cookbook was the first book about ancient dining to draw from both Greek and Roman writings. Each chapter describes a different social gathering and the food that might have been served on such an occasion. From a menu inspired by Homer’s Odyssey in 700 B.C., to the offerings at a typical Greek symposium or drinking party in fourth century Athens, to the special treats at a Macedonian wedding feast, the recipes presented here suggest the true variety of food and social life in the ancient Mediterranean.

Enjoy Parthian chicken, fish in coriander sauce, squash Alexandria-style, cabbage the Athenian way, pancakes with honey and sesame seeds, and many more tasty dishes. Each original recipe is followed by a version for today’s cook.

Unknown-1

Patrick Faas & Shaun Whiteside, Around the Roman Table: Food and Feasting in Ancient Rome

ISBN: 0226233472 | 2005 | 384 pages | University of Chicago Press

Craving dolphin meatballs? Can’t find a reliable restaurant for boiled parrot? Have a hankering for jellyfish omelettes, sows’ wombs in brine, sheep’s brain pate, or stuffed mice? Look no further than Around the Roman Table, a unique hybrid cookbook and history lesson. A portrait of Roman society from the vantage point of the dining table, kitchen, and market stalls, Around the Roman Table offers both an account of Roman eating customs and 150 recipes reconstructed for the modern cook.

Faas guides readers through the culinary conquests of Roman invasions—as conquerors pillaged foodstuffs from faraway lands—to the decadence of Imperial Rome and its associated table manners, dining arrangements, spices, seasonings, and cooking techniques. With recipes for such appetizing dishes as chicken galantine with lambs’ brains and fish relish, Around the Roman Table is ideal for food aficionados who wish to understand how the desire for power and conquest was manifested in Roman appetites.

“There are many misconceptions about the food of ancient Rome that Faas sets out to correct. The result is half cookbook, half history book and is entirely fascinating to both chef and antiquarian alike.”—Washington Times

 

Unknown copy

Barbara Flowers & Elisabeth Rosenbaum, The Roman Cookery Book: A Critical Translation of  the Art of Cooking, for Use in the Study and the Kitchen

ISBN: 1614272395 | 2012 | 246 pages | Martino Fine Books

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Roman-Cookery-Book-Critical-Translation/dp/1614272395/

From the 1958 edition. This is an English translation of the oldest known cookbook in existence. The book was originally written for professional cooks working in Ancient Rome, and contains actual recipes presented in the form of a cookbook. The work is translated with the intention of providing an actual cookbook rather than as a scholarly translation of an ancient text. Illustrated. The text is organized in ten books which are arranged in a manner similar to a modern cookbook: Epimeles – The Careful Housekeeper Sarcoptes – The Meat Mincer Cepuros – The Gardener Pandecter – Many Ingredients Ospreon – Pulse Aeropetes – Birds Polyteles – The Gourmet Tetrapus – The Quadruped Thalassa – The Sea Halieus – The Fisherman

 


Unknown-2

Ilaria Gozzini Giacosa, translated by Anna Herklotz, A Taste of Ancient Rome

ISBN: 0226290328 | 1994 | 239 pages | University of Chicago Press

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Taste-Ancient-Ilaria-Gozzini-Giacosa/dp/0226290328/

From Publishers Weekly

Neither an update for modern palates nor an anthropological study, this engrossing collection reproduces a two-thousand-year-old cuisine to “tempt the reader to explore some appetizing dishes from forgotten historical sources.”4 Relying primarily on the writings of Apicius, Cato, Coumella, Juvenal, Martial and Petroniussics , Giacosa recalls the foods and practices of the Roman meal, or cena , the banquet and the tavern. Though established centuries before the introduction of the tomato, eggplant or pasta, ancient Roman cuisine depended on some elements familiar to modern Italian cooking: eggs, vegetables, fish and poultry. Less familiar elements included dormice (served stuffed), thrushes (served roasted) and the widely used sun-fermented fish-based sauce called garum . The 200 recipes here for such representative selections as seasoned mussels and duck in prune sauce are offered in their original Latin and in English; Giocosa also provides additional instructions, as for stuffing pigeons, or substitutions for ingredients like silphium, which is no longer available. The dozens of line drawings of ancient foodstuffs and color plates of Pompeian taverns and food shops complete this culinary portrait. Useful for food historians, a treat for food buffs, the book takes a welcome new look at the origins of a familiar cuisine.

 

Unknown copy 2

Laurene R. Wells, Ancient Roman Eats: Roman Style Cooking for Modern Cooks

ISBN: 1480138568 | 2012 | 46 pages | CreateSpace

Ancient Roman Eats is an introduction to historical cooking from the Roman era. It is a cookbook containing recipes from Ancient Rome that can be prepared in the modern kitchen. Learn how to make Roman style cheese, Roman style doughnuts, and a Roman style chicken dinner. Learn what the favorite foods of the Romans were, and how they compare to foods we eat today. Also included are recipe suggestions for celebrating a Passover feast. Recipes vary in complexity from childishly simple to moderately complex. All recipes can be created in a modern home kitchen. Most recipes can be prepared with common kitchen tools such as bowls, spoons and baking dishes, while some require a few pieces of special equipment.

Unknown-3

 

Mark Grant, Roman Cookery: Ancient Recipes for Modern Kitchens

ISBN: 1897959605 | 2008 | 187 pages | Interlink Publishing

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Roman-Cookery-Ancient-Recipes-Kitchens/dp/1897959605/

This is one of the first books I’ve seen on classical/historical cooking that represents the “food of the people” rather than the fancy food of the nobility that Apicius and other gourmets were writing about. Grant uses some non-traditional sources such as works on agriculture to get some clues as to what the common people were eating. His recipes are easy to follow and generally easy to prepare. Great for anyone interested in historical cooking for everyday rather than party fare. – Patrick Cauldwell

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: